bridlebends:

Rook In The Ruins: a mix for a novel of fantasy and magic, of life and death, war and conquering, and who is to rule. 

i. wye oak - two small deaths, ii. marika hackman - wolf, iii. bat for lashes - trophy, iv. fever ray - keep the streets empty for me v. pj harvey - the darker days of me and him vi. cat power - the devil’s daughter vii. lady lamb the beekeeper - taxidermist, taxidermist viii. hiatus & shura - fortune’s fool ix. marika hackman - cinnamon x. wild beasts - two dancers II xi. wye oak - i know the law
LISTEN or DOWNLOAD

bridlebends:

Rook In The Ruins: a mix for a novel of fantasy and magic, of life and death, war and conquering, and who is to rule. 

i. wye oak - two small deaths, ii. marika hackman - wolf, iii. bat for lashes - trophy, iv. fever ray - keep the streets empty for me v. pj harvey - the darker days of me and him vi. cat power - the devil’s daughter vii. lady lamb the beekeeper - taxidermist, taxidermist viii. hiatus & shura - fortune’s fool ix. marika hackman - cinnamon x. wild beasts - two dancers II xi. wye oak - i know the law

LISTEN or DOWNLOAD

via  jaimelannister  (originally  bridlebends)
2 weeks ago on 30 March 2014 ~ 6:49am 647 notes

Her hair was the color of water in winter, and her bones were so delicate! She hardly had any breasts at all. When she danced, men killed themselves, knowing they would never again see such beauty. She had four lovers in Kiev, each richer than the other, but her heart was so cold that she could hold ice in her mouth and it would never melt.

Her hair was the color of water in winter, and her bones were so delicate! She hardly had any breasts at all. When she danced, men killed themselves, knowing they would never again see such beauty. She had four lovers in Kiev, each richer than the other, but her heart was so cold that she could hold ice in her mouth and it would never melt.

via  ladyellaria  (originally  lafourberie)
3 weeks ago on 27 March 2014 ~ 8:47am 1,252 notes

A beautiful cold girl in the snow, looking down at someone wretched, and not yielding.

via  oscarisaacs  (originally  nymiera)
1 month ago on 7 March 2014 ~ 10:42pm 785 notes
I will keep you,” he said softly, as sweet as black tea, “and I will keep you warm.
~  Deathless (Catherynne M. Valente)
via  cynthiadavies  (originally  songsofwolves)
2 months ago on 17 February 2014 ~ 10:37pm 823 notes

vintagegal:

"I ask for so little. Just fear me, love me, do as I say and I will be your slave."

I had to reblog this just for the Koschei/Marya parallel

tags   labrynth  
via  hunter-s-moon  (originally  vintagegal)
2 months ago on 17 February 2014 ~ 7:03pm 14,642 notes
hello! I was wondering, who do you picture as Baba Yaga in your fancast? Picture is probably the wrong word; I mean appearance-wise I think we're relying on lots of make-up, what I mean is who do you think would really nail Baba's attitude/character? (fantastic blog btw!)

first of all, thank you so much!! 

ummm tbh I don’t have a fancast. I kind of picture Baba Yaga as she’s portrayed in the art that accompanied Russian fairy tales that I read as a kid, just because that was my first exposure to her. But I’d love to hear everyone’s fancasts. I just fear that trying to fancast her will lead to us picturing one of the same like 10 older white women who are able to find consistent work in hollywood and I don’t feel super comfortable with that lol

2 months ago on 14 February 2014 ~ 1:33pm 1 note

etomoeserdtse:

If you haven’t read Deathless you’re missing out. I’m not sure I can cleanly articulate why but for me -

it was like drinking clean water and coming back to understand why I studied what I studied, why the important things stick and bite down into your soul

how even the domovie had to form committees to remain relevant how even these creatures who could rule homes had to watch their words and swallow them down. can you imagine reinventing your language in a moment’s notice? words that you were free to speak were no longer available to you (if you wanted to stay free) truth was no longer available to you (if you wanted to stay free) but the trick here is that no one was free

how this book references all the great Russian authors, specifically of that time period but also looking back. when you’re reading about Marya’s great feast you should be thinking of Gogol’s great love for describing food (but remember that he starved himself), when you read about the wartorn streets and Marya’s drawn face looking over her men remember Babel and the dead goose, when you read about Marya in love remember Margarita, who made a deal with the devil and would burn down the world for her lover

but remember too that this book is not about the aesthetics of Russia or Marya’s love, but is the story of Russia’s bloody history through folklore, specifically Russian folklore, which is soaked in blood and hope. Baba Yaga sits in her house and she’ll swallow your soul in a moment if you don’t treat her right. the thing is to know how to navigate your world (remember Solzhenitsyn in the gulag, he walked through death and came through but you don’t come out unchanged. remember that prison narratives are stories about the underworld).

Everything in this book maps. It is meticulously researched. The language is evocative of Russian speech, the images are dark and beautiful and rend like the broken hopes of the poets who dreamed the revolution would bring something good. Have you read Mayakovsky? He shouts because he’s afraid no one would hear. He killed himself. Have you read Bulgakov? He told the truth, and he died. Have you read Babel? He died. Have you read Blok? Esenin? They died they died they died under the heel of terror, under a system who knew full well the power of literature and art and how dangerous it is

and this book, Deathless, is a love letter to all of them, to everyone who died, to the culture that was murdered, and to the beauty that still remains.

So if you read this book, and all you take away is Marya dressed in red with Koschei her lover, and the power of makeup, and ruling with an iron fist, I understand, because these are strong and powerful images, but I beg of you to dig deeper than that. This book is offering a very accessible window into Russian culture and literature, and if you ignore it you’ve missed the point.

via  hotelsongs  (originally  etomoeserdtse)
2 months ago on 10 February 2014 ~ 11:11pm 153 notes
I don't know why but when i read, i see koschei a little bit as ben barnes (the hair especially) lol

I guess I could see that, yeah

Ben doesn’t really have the ability to scare me lol his roles (well the ones I’ve seen, which in fairness are limited to Prince Caspian and Dorian Gray) are always so completely opposite of Koschei and his features are so soft and youthful and idk he kind of lacks the magnetic stage presence I picture necessary for Koschei (I feel like you’d watch Koschei and have to have this feeling as if you were in the presence of a vampire every second, like you’d be hyper aware of how not human he was). But coloring wise, yeah I could see that 

2 months ago on 4 February 2014 ~ 8:34pm 1 note
margraery:

Deathless Meme (1/6 quotes)

"I savor bitterness — it is born of experience. It is the privilegde of one who has truly lived. You, too, must learn to prefer it. After all, when all else is gone, you may still have bitterness in abundance."

margraery:

Deathless Meme (1/6 quotes)

"I savor bitterness — it is born of experience. It is the privilegde of one who has truly lived. You, too, must learn to prefer it. After all, when all else is gone, you may still have bitterness in abundance."

via  wildlinging  (originally  margraery)
2 months ago on 4 February 2014 ~ 2:43am 326 notes
One question that has always intrigued me is what happens to demonic beings when immigrants move from their homelands. Irish-Americans remember the fairies, Norwegian-Americans the nisser, Greek-Americans the vrykolakas, but only in relation to events remembered in the Old Country. When I once asked why such demons are not seen in America, my informants giggled confusedly and said ‘They’re scared to pass the ocean, it’s too far,’ pointing out that Christ and the apostles never came to America.
~

Richard Dorson, “A Theory for American Folklore,” 

American Folklore and the Historian

(University of Chicago Press, 1971)

via  philcoulson  (originally  fallenangelontheceiling)
2 months ago on 2 February 2014 ~ 10:29pm 317 notes